Temple of Literature launches audio guide service for tourists

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The Temple of Literature, a popular tourist attraction in Hanoi, launched an audio guide service for visitors on January 11.

>>Tourism thrives, says Tourism General Director

Audio guide for tourists

The system, developed by the site’s Culture and Science Centre, provides visitors with information in audio form on the establishment and development of the Temple of Literature as well as the heritage’s value. The information was thoroughly revised by cultural researchers and experts. The audio guide is available in eight languages: Vietnamese, English, French, Spanish, Korean, Japanese, Thai and Chinese.

To experience the service, visitors put on their headphones, which are connected with handheld devices, select the targeted language, and then explore at their leisure. A new way-finding and sign guideline system designed by French experts were also put into operation on the occasion.

The improvements aim to better serve visitors to the Temple of Literature, thus making the site more attractive to tourists from both home and abroad. The site greeted 1.6 million visitors in 2017, 60% of which were foreigners.

Temple of Literature launches audio guide service for tourists via vanmieu.gov.vn

About the temple of Literature

The Temple of Literature is a Temple of Confucius in Hanoi, northern Vietnam. The temple hosts the Imperial Academy, Vietnam’s first national university. The temple was built in 1070 at the time of Emperor Lý Thánh Tông. It is one of several temples in Vietnam which is dedicated to Confucius, sages and scholars. The temple is located to the south of the Imperial Citadel of Thăng Long. The various pavilions, halls, statues and stelae of doctors are places where offering ceremonies, study sessions and the strict exams of the Đại Việt took place. The temple is featured on the back of the 100,000 Vietnamese đồng banknote. Just before the Vietnamese New Year celebration Tết, calligraphists will assemble outside the temple and write wishes in Hán characters. The art works are given away as gifts or are used as home decorations for special occasions.
 
The temple layout is similar to that of the temple at Qufu, Shandong, Confucius’ birthplace. It covers an area of over 54000 square metres, including the Văn lake, Giám park and the interior courtyards which are surrounded by a brick wall. In front of the Great Gate are four tall pillars. On either side of the pillars are two stelae commanding horsemen to dismount.
 
Temple of Literature launches audio guide service for tourists via The thao & Van hoa

The gate opens onto three pathways which continues through the complex. The centre path was reserved for the monarch and above the center path there is a big bronze bell, The path to the left is for the administrative Mandarins and the path to the right is for military Mandarins. The interior of the site is divided into five courtyards. The first two courtyards are quiet areas with ancient trees and trimmed lawns, where scholars would relax away from the bustle of the outside world.

The bell located above the main gate was used to signify that an important person was coming through and was added to the Văn Miếu in the 19th century. The bell was made out of Bronze and could only be touched by monks. On the bell several patterns can be found including an outline of a phoenix, which represents beauty, and a dragon, which represents power. Both of these symbols are used to represent the Emperor and Queen. A bell can be found in all of the pagodas in Vietnam.

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